News Release

FINRA Fines Merrill Lynch $1.4 Million for Supervisory Deficiencies Related to Extended Settlement Transactions

WASHINGTON — The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) announced today that it has fined Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated $1.4 million for failing to establish a reasonable supervisory system and procedures to identify and evaluate extended settlement transactions, and for related rule violations.

Extended settlement transactions have a longer time between trade and settlement than routine securities transactions, and therefore involve an extension of credit and exposure to counterparty, credit and market risk. As a result of its supervisory deficiencies, Merrill failed to collect adequate margin to offset this risk, improperly extended credit to cash-account customers, and miscalculated its outstanding margin and net capital.

FINRA found that from at least April 2013 through June 2015, Merrill's customers engaged in extended settlement transactions with notional values of hundreds of millions of dollars across numerous firm product lines. Despite the prevalence of these transactions, Merrill's supervisory system, including written supervisory procedures, was not reasonably designed to identify and evaluate extended settlement transactions for compliance with margin and net capital rules. Consequently, Merrill's computation of margin requirements and net capital deductions for tens of thousands of extended settlement transactions was inaccurate, resulting in margin rule and net capital violations, as well as inaccurate books and records and FOCUS Report filings.

FINRA also found that Merrill improperly extended hundreds of millions of dollars of margin credit in numerous retail customers' cash accounts, in violation of Regulation T. These transactions should only have been permitted in margin accounts, not in customer cash accounts.

Merrill knew that its supervisory system was not reasonably designed to achieve compliance in connection with extended settlement transactions by April 2013. However, Merrill failed to implement any remedial measures until mid-2014. Moreover, Merrill failed to establish a firm-wide supervisory system and written procedures to address extended settlement transactions until mid-2015. FINRA found that Merrill's failures to promptly address the deficiencies after it knew about them unreasonably delayed its compliance with applicable margin, net capital, and books and records rules, as well as Regulation T.

Susan Schroeder, FINRA Executive Vice President, Department of Enforcement, said: "Firms that engage in extended settlement transactions must implement a supervisory system and procedures reasonably tailored to ensure compliance with applicable rules such as margin and net capital rules, as well as Regulation T. Furthermore, firms that are aware of deficiencies in their supervisory systems must promptly remediate them."

In settling this matter, Merrill Lynch neither admitted nor denied the charges, but consented to the entry of FINRA's findings.

Investors can obtain more information about, and the disciplinary record of, any FINRA-registered broker or brokerage firm by using FINRA's BrokerCheck. FINRA makes BrokerCheck available at no charge. In 2016, members of the public used this service to conduct 111 million reviews of broker or firm records. Investors can access BrokerCheck at www.finra.org/brokercheck or by calling (800) 289-9999. Investors may find copies of this disciplinary action as well as other disciplinary documents in FINRA's Disciplinary Actions Online database. Investors can also call FINRA's Securities Helpline for Seniors at (844) 57-HELPS for assistance or to raise concerns about issues they have with their brokerage accounts and investments.

FINRA is dedicated to investor protection and market integrity. It regulates one critical part of the securities industry – brokerage firms doing business with the public in the United States. FINRA, overseen by the SEC, writes rules, examines for and enforces compliance with FINRA rules and federal securities laws, registers broker-dealer personnel and offers them education and training, and informs the investing public. In addition, FINRA provides surveillance and other regulatory services for equities and options markets, as well as trade reporting and other industry utilities. FINRA also administers a dispute resolution forum for investors and brokerage firms and their registered employees. For more information, visit www.finra.org.